Lost or Stolen British Passports

This page caters for cases where British passport holders have either had their passports lost or stolen and they need to apply from South Africa. Therefore this caters for British nationals (or dual nationals), in South Africa, that wish to reapply for their British passport.

At this stage, please note that Move Up complies with the standards set out by UKIASA (UK Immigration Authority of South Africa). With this compliance in mind, Move Up provides the following products and services:

UKIASA Compliance of British Passport First Time Applications

This applies to cases where the applicant was born in the UK.

To qualify under this category, not only does the applicant have to evidence that they were born in the UK but they also have to evidence that their parent (either one or both) has previously held ILR (permanent resident) status (either as a South African or as a British national).

It is important to note: Applicants (South Africans born in the UK to South African parents) do not automatically qualify for British citizenship.

Applications prior to 2012 placed emphasis on applicants eligibility only being through the legitimate line. Fortunately a change in ruling now passes British nationality through paternal birth (legitimate or illegitimate) line.

In layman terms, this now means that South Africans can claim British citizenship (and get a British passport) if their father was born in the UK. Regardless of the fact that their father was married (or not married) to their biological mother.

This caters for South Africans (born in South Africa) that have a biological mother that was born in the UK. More specifically, this particular case is only available to South Africans (applicants) that were born before 1 January 1983.

This caters for South Africans (born in South Africa) that have a biological mother that was born in the UK. More specifically, this particular case is only available to South Africans (applicants) that were born after 31 December 1982.

Often we get South Africans calling us to say “but my parent has a British passport”. When it comes to British nationality, it is important to find out how ones parent gained that British passport.

In the event that the applicant’s parent earned their British nationality because they lived continuously in the UK for a minimum of 5 years, chances are that the applicants parent received a “Certificate of Nationalization”.

It is important to note that a “Certificate of Nationalization” is different to a “Certificate of Registration”. Emphasis in this case is on Certificate of Nationalization.

Instead of claiming British nationality through parents earned certificate, this case makes provision for the applicant themselves who earned that certificate.

In this case, it is standard practice that the applicant has gone through the visa motions. In example, applied for entry clearance, lived continuously in the UK and eventually earned ILR (permanent resident) status. Thereafter, spent at least one more year in the UK to qualify and earn the required British certificate of nationalization.

What is unique in this case is that the applicants’ British Certificate of Registration also applies.

This generally applies to cases where applicants were born between 1970-1990 and more specifically when the Cape Town British Consulate facilitated this.

At present, the Cape Town British Consulate no longer facilitates registering foreign births (ie birth that take place in South Africa) as British citizens.

If you are one of the lucky ones who has a British registered birth, even though you were born in SA, this case applies to you.

To find out more how Move Up can help, we encourage applicants to contact us.